Guess we could call this part II of the photos from my fishing trip this summer. I said I had a bunch of photos of plants and flowers too, and here they are! This is a very image heavy post, so consider yourself warned. ☺

Arctic Starflower (Trientalis Europaea)
Arctic Starflower (Trientalis europaea)

Arctic Starflower (Trientalis Europaea)

Arctic starflower (Trientalis europaea)

This is my absolute favourite flower: the Arctic starflower (Trientalis europaea)!
Here we call them “forest stars”, which is a perfect description of what they look like. When walking through the woods, they shine like bright little stars in the undergrowth. Especially if it’s a bit dark outside. They’re so tiny yet impossible to miss. I find them just magical!

Purple mountain heather (Phyllodoce caerulea)

Purple mountain heather (Phyllodoce caerulea)

Bog-rosemary (Andromeda polifolia)

Bog-rosemary (Andromeda polifolia)

Lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea)

Lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea)

The lingonberries are probably the most important berries we have. They’re called the “red gold of the forest” because you can actually earn a decent buck by selling them. We even have foreigners coming from all over the world to pick wild berries in our forests. It’s a whole industry.

Lingonberries are very pretty, and lingonberry jam is a household essential in Swedish kitchens. But I’ve always preferred blueberries and cloudberries myself.

Red belt conk (Fomitopsis pinicola)

Red belt conk (Fomitopsis pinicola)

Tinder fungus (Fomes fomentarius)

Tinder fungus (Fomes fomentarius)

Shelf fungi are pretty cool, and they come in such a great variety of shapes and colours. I always like finding them on trees. Although I suck at naming the different species, so I’m not 100% sure about the ones above.

Red clover (Trifolium Pratense)

Red clover (Trifolium Pratense)

Bunchberry (Cornus suecica)

Bunchberry (Cornus suecica)

Heather (Calluna vulgaris)

Somewhat overblown heather (Calluna vulgaris)

Interesting pine tree

Bonus pic of a weird pine tree. Wonder what caused it to split itself like that? Maybe has something to do with the big growth further down on the trunk?

I don’t know if the plants in this post are really exclusive to the subarctic, but I think at least some of them are.
Let me know if you saw something here you haven’t seen before. 🙂