Hope everyone had a nice Christmas! And that you will have a happy New Year!
We were at Markus’ parents this year. The weather hasn’t improved at all, it’s been a very warm and wet and slippery week… Still had a good time though.

We have a tendency to celebrate on the eve of holidays, so here all the exciting stuff happens on the 24th – Christmas Eve. Christmas Day we went to see The Desolation of Smaug, expect a review from me soon. 😉

I took a lot of photos of food this year, and since everyone likes eating (right?), I thought I could show you what we had:

Fatost, blana, rödbetssallad

At the front of the picture is fatost. It’s like an.. eh.. omelette I guess. It’s made with milk, rennet, eggs, syrup, and spices. I assure you it tastes a lot better than it looks.

At the top left we have boiled eggs topped with a mayonnaise mix of some sort.

Next to the eggs is a bowl of “blana”. It’s whipped cream mixed with whey cheese and cinnamon. I had never heard of it until I met Markus. Apparently it’s only eaten in that particular part of the country, so it’s very local. I love it though, I could’ve eaten that whole bowl myself!

Top right is beetroots salad decorated with whipped cream. Pretty to look at but I don’t like it at all.

Christmas ham and jellied veal

Christmas ham! We have that instead of turkeys. 🙂 And in the background is slices of jellied veal.

Venison: reindeer, deer, moose

A platter of assorted meats. Smoked venison, reindeer salami, and slices of tenderloin among others.

Pickled herring and eggs

Pickled herring. Because Swedes can’t do anything without their precious herrings. Tastes pretty meh if you ask me.

Raw spiced salmon

Now we’re talking! Slices of gravlax, raw spiced salmon. Like sushi but better. This is one of my favourite foods in the whole world. :love: I could eat just this and nothing else, it’s so delicious.

The jar to the right contains herring pickled in mustard. Why anyone would eat herring when there’s gravlax nearby is a mystery to me.

Other than that we also had meatballs, spareribs and boiled potatoes. Traditions vary between families and regions, but all in all it’s a pretty standard north Swedish Christmas dinner.

What do you eat at Christmas? (I mean, if you even do Christmas?)